Form Drawing for Beginners

written and illustrated by Donna Simmons

Christopherus Homeschool Resources

Spiral Bound

$23.00

I had intended to quickly review this amazing introduction to form drawing — to capture it’s contents and let you know what you could find in it. You know, the usual. And I will still do that, but first I want to share with you what I found that completely redirected my original intention.

I fully expected Donna’s presentation to be what all her work has been: thorough, to-the-point, completely explained, intensely engaging. It is all that, but it is something much more, also. What I discovered when I opened the book was that Donna has explained in the warmest, friendliest and (as though as an added bonus) most concise way I’ve encountered just WHY form drawing is so important for our children, and for us. Her explanation is so simple, yet goes straight to the heart of not just form drawing, but the purpose of Waldorf education and of life itself. In two pages she allows us to step with her into a way of looking at life that is rich and vast with possibilities for growth. I’ve seen nothing in writing that is more alive than Donna Simmons’ short introduction to form drawing — it just doesn’t get better than this.

And the content — the perfect beginning! After addressing FAQs such as “Do I always have to tell a story?” and “How do I know when to move on to the next form?”, Donna offers a check list of things to remember about form drawing, how to help yourself and your child, etc.

Finally, the remainder of the book is devoted to sequential forms for 1st, 2nd and 3rd grade and covers all the basics from Curves and Straight Lines to Crossing the Midline and Advanced Forms.

One cannot develop moral forces by talking at children or by moralizing, but by doing certain things with the cildren over and over again, by emphasis on the element of will. One must count on the metamorphosis of soul forces: what one has incorporated into the will of the growing child changes and comes to life later as moral feeling and moral imagination. It awakens as a new moral consciousness with the impulse to do in freedom and with love what necessity and duty require.

Neidermeyer and Frohlich Form Drawing from the beginning of Form Drawing for Beginners

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